Unique art from survivors of brain injury

Artist Nick Mayers, a member of the Submit to Love studio collective.

Artists Nick Mayers, a member of the Submit to Love studio collective.

A unique art collective in London consisting of brain injury survivors is exhibiting its “unguarded, emotive” work for the first time.

The Submit to Love Studios, supported by brain injury charity Headway East London, is a creative space in Hackney for over 50 survivors of brain injury – barely any of the artists had practiced art before their injuries. The work of around 30 of the collective’s members is featured in a new exhibition that runs until 23 February at Stratford Circus Arts Centre.

MRI, by Graham Naylor, showing as part of an exhibition by brain injury survivors (credit: Headway east London)

MRI, by Graham Naylor, showing as part of an exhibition by brain injury survivors (credit: Headway east London)

Artist Jon Barry's work, Lady in Green, in progress.

Artist Jon Barry’s work, Lady in Green, in progress.

Birds, by Laura Wood

Birds, by Laura Wood

While many of the creatives have had solo exhibitions since joining the project, this is the first time they are showing work that outlines how their experiences, including recovery, have influenced their art. The show asks visitors to consider the question “how far can one life-changing incident be seen in the artistic work you create?”.

In a related event this Saturday, the collective, which began 10 years ago, is involved in an free art workshop at London’s Southbank Centre. The event involves the artists encouraging the public to participate in on the theme of “what love means to you” with contributions acting as the basis for a collaborative piece at the Submit to Love studio. The workshop takes place in the Clore Ballroom at Royal Festival Hall on Saturday 11am – 2pm and is recommended for ages six upwards.

Freckle Face, by Chippy Aiton

Freckle Face, by Chippy Aiton

Elvis in London, by Cecil Waldron

Elvis in London, by Cecil Waldron

Creature, by Ad

Creature, by Ad

According to Headway, survivors of brain injury are often excluded from society, have lost skills, occupations and cannot communicate as they used to; art is an outlet for communication and self-expression. The charity is keen to reposition art from a simple rehabilitation activity to “both a vocation and passion project”.

Three Chicks Going to a Do, by Tony Allen

Three Chicks Going to a Do, by Tony Allen

* The exhibition, sponsored by Hyphen Law, is open 9am-6pm (Mon-Sat) and 09.30am–2pm (Sun) until Tuesday 23 February 2017 and entry is free. Venue: Stratford Circus Arts Centre, Theatre Square, London E15

About Saba Salman

Saba Salman is a social affairs journalist and commissioning editor who writes regularly for The Guardian. Saba is a trustee of the charity Sibs, which supports siblings of disabled children and adults, and an RSA fellow. She is a former Evening Standard local government and social affairs correspondent.
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