Arts festival uses digital tech for social inclusion

Participants promoting their festival. Photo: Stephen Candy

Participants promoting their festival. Photo: Stephen Candy

A few images here from an innovative digital arts festival due to take place this weekend (10-12 July). The interactive event, which I wrote about today for the Guardian’s online social care pages, will feature giant portraits of learning disabled people projected onto buildings, a game played with an accessible mapping app and an inclusive, high-tech design workshop to re-imagine a town centre.

Creating percussion sounds for the music element of the festival. Photo: Annalees Lim.

Creating percussion sounds for the music element of the festival. Photo: Annalees Lim.

Mixing music for the festival. Photo: Annalees Lim .

Mixing music for the festival. Photo: Annalees Lim .

SprungDigi crew member mixing SprungDigi theme song. Photo: Stephen Candy.

SprungDigi crew member mixing SprungDigi theme song. Photo: Stephen Candy.

People with learning disabilities will help stage the innovative art installations and music and dance performances that they have created alongside digital and community arts practitioners. The inaugural SprungDigi Festival in Horsham, West Sussex, runs from Friday until Sunday.

The name of the free event reflects the concept that digital technology and online activity can be a springboard to social inclusion. The aim is to ensure that people with learning disabilities are more visible and feel more connected to their local areas. Read the rest of the piece here and check this festival page for more information about the weekend.

About Saba Salman

Saba Salman is a social affairs journalist and commissioning editor who writes regularly for The Guardian. Saba is a trustee of the charity Sibs, which supports siblings of disabled children and adults, and an RSA fellow. She is a former Evening Standard local government and social affairs correspondent.
This entry was posted in Disability, Learning disability, Local government, media & communication, Mental health, Social care, Social exclusion, Uncategorized, Young people and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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